What is “DRAM” ?

DRAM (Dynamic Random-Access Memory) – A type of random-access memory that stores each bit of data in a separate capacitor within an integrated circuit. The capacitor can be either charged or discharged; these two states are taken to represent the two values of a bit, conventionally called 0 and 1. Since even “nonconducting” transistors always leak a small amount, the capacitors will slowly discharge, and the information eventually fades unless the capacitor charge is refreshed periodically. Because of this refresh requirement, it is a dynamic memory as opposed to static random access memory (SRAM) and other static types of memory.

The main memory (the “RAM”) in personal computers is dynamic RAM (DRAM). It is the RAM in desktops, laptops and workstation computers as well as some of the RAM of video game consoles. In contrast, SRAM, which is faster and more expensive than DRAM, is typically used for CPU caches.

The advantage of DRAM is its structural simplicity: only one transistor and a capacitor are required per bit, compared to four or six transistors in SRAM. This allows DRAM to reach very high densities. Unlike flash memory, DRAM is volatile memory (vs. non-volatile memory), since it loses its data quickly when power is removed. The transistors and capacitors used are extremely small; billions can fit on a single memory chip.

Due to the nature of its memory cells, DRAM consumes relatively large amounts of power, with different ways for managing the power consumption.

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Source: Wikipedia

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